5.5 Travel

1. Rules of the Road From the Uniform Guidance

§ 200.438 Entertainment costs

Costs of entertainment, including amusement, diversion, and social activities and any associated costs are unallowable, except where specific costs that might otherwise be considered entertainment have a programmatic purpose and are authorized either in the approved budget for the Federal award or with prior written approval of the Federal awarding agency.

§200.474 Lodging and subsistence. Costs incurred by employees and officers for travel, including costs of lodging, other subsistence, and incidental expenses, shall be considered reasonable and allowable only to the extent such costs do not exceed charges normally allowed by the institution in its regular operations as the result of the institution’s written travel policy

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2. Travel

Generally, all flights charged to federal projects must be taken on U.S. flag air carriers or on foreign air carriers that code share with a U.S. flag carrier on the flight taken. This includes flights within the U.S. If there is no U.S. carrier to your destination, you must travel on a U.S. carrier as far as possible. By law, additional cost for U.S. carrier flights is not sufficient justification to fly on foreign carriers. Please note that the same rules apply to a foreign visitor's flights when supported by federal funds.

See list of U.S. Flag Air Carriers and Code Share Alliances.

Open Skies Exceptions

The biggest exception to the Fly America Act is the Open Skies Agreement. On October 6, 2010, the United States and European Union (EU) "Open Skies" Air Transport Agreement was published by the U.S. General Services Administration providing full explanation of the multilateral agreement in place so that qualifying travelers, whose travel is supported by federal funds, may travel on European Union airlines as well as U.S. flag air carriers. A list of current member countries of the European Union is available at the Europa web site (plus Norway and Iceland). There are also Open Skies agreements with Australia, Switzerland and Japan.

What does the Open Skies Agreement mean to Stanford Travelers?

When air travel is supported by federal funds, travel to the following destinations must either be on a U.S. carrier or, for specific destinations, may be on a European Union (EU) (plus Norway and Iceland), Australian, Japanese, or Swiss airline.

Claim Unidentified Receipts Workflow

Important Note:  The Open Skies Agreements do not apply if travel is funded by the Department of Defense (DOD) or by a department of the U.S. Military. Travel funded by the DOD or by a U.S. military department must be on a U.S. flag air carrier.

If travel includes stay in Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Sudan, or Syria, travel plans must be reviewed by the University Export Control Officer. See Policy Notes: Export Control/Trade Sanctions Compliance Requirements for more information.

Follow the International Travel Policy issued by Provost Persis Drell

Additional Exceptions

Other strictly limited circumstances in which an exception may be allowed include:

  • a U.S. flag carrier does not provide service on a particular leg of your trip,
  • the use of a U.S. carrier will unreasonably delay your travel time
  • you are involuntarily rerouted, or
  • medical or safety reasons.

Refer to the Certification of Exception to Fly America Act Form to help identify legitimate exceptions for use of a non-U.S. carrier.

Resources

Stanford University personnel (faculty, students and staff) must comply with policy related to Export Control, Trade Sanctions and travel to countries identified as "State Sponsors of Terrorism." This includes:

·         Travel with Laptops and Other Digital Storage Devices

·         Travel with Materials, Prototypes, Equipment, and Components

Please go to Fingate for more information
 

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3. Test Your Understanding

The Situation

PI supported by an NSF grant took collaborators who were all attending a conference in San Diego.  They met on a dinner bay cruise to discuss research.

The cost per person was $80.00 which included food, music and a quiet place to discuss the multi-site research project. 

Can the cruise and the food be charged to the grant?
one
Answer: 
No
correct
The boat cruise is considered entertainment and therefore unallowable and cannot be charged.
Answer: 
Yes
incorrect
The boat cruise is considered entertainment and therefore unallowable and cannot be charged.
Is the boat cuise allowable, allocable and reasonable?
one
Answer: 
Yes
incorrect
The boat cruise is considered entertainment and therefore unallowable and cannot be charged.
Answer: 
No
correct
The boat cruise is considered entertainment and therefore unallowable and cannot be charged.
The PI must pay for the cruise with unrestricted funds if it is not allowable, allocable and reasonable?
one
Answer: 
True
correct
Answer: 
False
incorrect
Can the food for those traveling be charged?
one
Answer: 
No
incorrect
The food is allowable for those on travel status and can be charged as a travel expense if the cost is reasonable.
The food is allowable for those on travel status and can be charged as a travel expense if the cost is reasonable.
Answer: 
Yes
correct
The food is allowable for those on travel status and can be charged as a travel expense if the cost is reasonable.
The food is allowable for those on travel status and can be charged as a travel expense if the cost is reasonable.

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