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Shared Scientific Facilities Management System

Shared Scientific Facilities Management System (iLab)

What is iLab?

The Stanford Shared Scientific Facilities Management System, commonly referred to as iLab, is a web application some Stanford Shared Scientific Facilities have adopted to manage the process of requesting, scheduling and billing. It provides researchers and administrators at Stanford and outside institutions a centralized marketplace and billing system.

Researchers who want to obtain and pay for the offerings of these facilities must use iLab. Administrators who support those researchers must use iLab to review and approve financial transactions.

How do I access iLab?

Sign in or login to iLab. You can also find a list of facilities that have adopted iLab.

iLab Training

A course titled, iLab for Stanford Administrators, is for financial administrators who must use iLab. In the iLab system they are termed iLab Lab Manager. Although the term is the same, this role is different from that of the typical Stanford lab manager.

If you would like to read the course material without getting credit in STARS for taking this course, simply click View Material in the box on this site.

 

Chemistry

Chemistry NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) Facility

Contact

NMR Lab Manager

Stephen Lynch, srlynch@stanford.edu, (650) 725-0245

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Available Equipment

The NMR Facility for the Stanford University Chemistry Department houses 5 Varian NMR Spectrometers:

Inova 300 Varian 400 Mercury 400 Inova 500 Inova 600

Chemistry Optics Facility

Contact

Staff Scientist

Stephen Lynch, srlynch@stanford.edu, (650) 725-0245

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Available Equipment

The Optics Facility for the Stanford University Chemistry Department houses 4 Optical Spectroscopy Instruments:

Fluorolog 3 Fluorimeter (2 instruments) 

Vertex 70 FTIR with RAM II Raman accessory

Cary 6000i UV/Vis/NIR Spectrometer

Stanford University Mass Spectrometry (SUMS)

Beyond making available state-of-the-art, user-friendly facilities and services, the laboratory enables education, methods development, and new applications development, designed to meet the rapidly evolving needs of researchers. Due to the essential information that mass spectrometry provides to researchers in the fields of the physical and life sciences, medicine, and engineering, the laboratory serves as an “intellectual watering hole” at the crossroads of diverse disciplines.

Contact

People

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Environmental Sciences

Stanford Earth Shared Analytical Facilities and Research Resources

Shared analytical facilities in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences are labs that enable efficiencies of time, knowledge, and resources. They are school supported, funded, and staffed, and are shared by faculty, staff, and students across the university. Stanford Earth also maintains advanced computing facilities and is the location of Stanford's Branner Earth Sciences Library and Map Collections.

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Analysis of Gene/Protein Function

High Throughput Bioscience Center (HTBC)

This high-throughput screening (HTS) laboratory allows Stanford researchers and others to discover novel modulators of targets that otherwise would not be practical in industry. The center incorporates instrumentation (purchased with NCRR NIH Instrumentation grant numbers S10RR019513, S10RR026338, and S10OD025004), databases , compound libraries , and personnel whose previous sole domains were in industry.

The High-Throughput Bioscience Center's mission is to provide researchers at Stanford with the ability to run high-throughput chemical , siRNA , cDNA , and high-content screens for the purpose of drug and/or target discovery.

Authority

David E. Solow-Cordero, Ph.D.

Contact Information

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Neuroscience Gene Vector and Virus Core (GVVC)

The delivery of recombinant genes into neurons is a critically important strategy for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying all brain functions, as well as for how these mechanisms go awry in brain disorders. A complementary and equally important strategy is delivery of inhibitory RNAs to eliminate or reduce specific brain proteins. Genetically engineered viruses provide powerful tools for introducing these constructs into brain cells. Indeed it is now possible, using a single virus particle, to both eliminate specific proteins and replace them with modified versions in specific subsets of cells in the brain. It is also possible, using viruses, to express proteins that will allow precise control over the electrical activity of individual nerve cells. These virally mediated molecular manipulations allow unprecedented experimental control over synapses, cells and circuits in model systems as well as in vivo in the mammalian brain.

To facilitate the use of these state-of-the-art methodologies by Stanford neuroscientists, the Neuroscience Gene Vector and Virus Core centralizes the process of producing and distributing viral vectors and cDNA plasmids. This benefits the Neurosciences Institute's overall mission by preventing the duplication of efforts by Stanford faculty and thus greatly increasing the efficiency of all of our programs.

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Protein and Nucleic Acid Facility (PAN)

The Protein and Nucleic Acid (PAN) Facility is a multifaceted biotechnology fee-for-service laboratory. The PAN Biotechnology Facility offers a diverse array of instrumentation and technical capabilities and plays a significant consultative role in the application of these technologies to basic science projects.

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Stanford Functional Genomics Facility (SFGF)

The Stanford Functional Genomics Facility (SFGF) is a service center in the Stanford School of Medicine providing the following genomics services:

  • High-throughput Sequencing (Illumina)
  • Library Generation for Illumina High-throughput Sequencing
  • Microarray Gene Expression (Affymetrix, Agilent, Illumina)
  • QC for RNA, DNA, and High-throughput Sequencing Libraries
  • Whole Genome Genotyping (Illumina)
  • Real-time PCR gene expression, genotyping, melt, etc.
  • Sample Preps DNA and RNA extractions, Plasmid preps
  • NanoString
  • Microarrays and Microarray Printing
  • 24/7 Access to Instrumentation and Software

Authority

John Coller, PhD

Contact

microarray@stanford.edu

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Transgenic, Knockout and Tumor Model Center (TKTC)

To address the molecular basis of human diseases and develop novel therapeutic strategies for their treatment, an important component is to create animal models that can recapitulate human disease states. Partly supported by funds from the Stanford Cancer Institute, since 1996 the Transgenic, Knockout and Tumor model Center (TKTC) has produced in vitro and in vivo models to support research in a variety of different fields and applications.

Our goal is to provide the scientific community inside and outside of Stanford with the intellectual and technical expertise to develop the right “lever” they need to address their research questions.

Contact Information

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Databases

Pharmacogenomics Knowledge Base PharmGKB

The PharmGKB is a pharmacogenomics knowledge resource that encompasses clinical information including clinical guidelines and drug labels, potentially clinically actionable gene-drug associations and genotype-phenotype relationships. PharmGKB collects, curates and disseminates knowledge about the impact of human genetic variation on drug responses through the following activities:

  • Annotate genetic variants and gene-drug-disease relationships via literature review
  • Summarize important pharmacogenomic genes, associations between genetic variants and drugs, and drug pathways
  • Curate FDA drug labels containing pharmacogenomic information
  • Enable consortia examining important questions in pharmacogenomics
  • Curate and participate in writing pharmacogenomic-based drug dosing guidelines
  • Contribute to clinical implementation projects for pharmacogenomics through collaborations
  • Publish pharmacogenomic-based drug dosing guidelines, very important pharmacogene summaries and drug-centered pathways
  • Display all information on the website and provide comprehensive downloads

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Aspergillus Genome Database (AspGD)

AspGD is an organized collection of genetic and molecular biological information about the filamentous fungi of the genus Aspergillus. Among its many species, the genus contains an excellent model organism (A. nidulans, or its teleomorph Emericella nidulans), an important pathogen of the immunocompromised (A. fumigatus), an agriculturally important toxin producer (A. flavus), and two species used in industrial processes (A. niger and A. oryzae). AspGD contains information about genes and proteins of multiple Aspergillus species; descriptions and classifications of their biological roles, molecular functions, and subcellular localizations; gene, protein, and chromosome sequence information; tools for analysis and comparison of sequences; and links to literature information; as well as a multispecies comparative genomics browser tool (Sybil) for exploration of orthology and synteny across multiple sequenced Aspergillus species

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Candida Genome Database (CGD)

This is the home of the Candida Genome Database, a resource for genomic sequence data and gene and protein information for Candida albicans and related species. CGD is based on the Saccharomyces Genome Database and is funded by the National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research at the US National Institutes of Health.

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Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD)

The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) provides comprehensive integrated biological information for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae along with search and analysis tools to explore these data, enabling the discovery of functional relationships between sequence and gene products in fungi and higher organisms.

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FACS

Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting Facility (FACS)

Stanford Shared FACS Facility has been providing the Stanford research community with flow cytometry instrumentation and expertise since 1989.  This Shared Resource lab provides operator-assisted analyzer and sorter use, as well as training and support for user instrument operation.

Facility Staff

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Gene Expression Profiling, Genotyping & Genomic Analysis

Genetics Bioinformatics Service Center (GBSC)

Genetics Bioinformatics Service Center (GBSC) is a School of Medicine service center operated by Department of Genetics. GBSC is set up to facilitate massive scale genomics at Stanford and supports omics, microbiome, sensor, and phenotypic data types. Our facilities are available to any Stanford University researcher and Stanford affiliates unless noted otherwise.

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Sequencing Service Center

The Sequencing Service Center (SSC) allows the Stanford community to access cost-effective high throughput sequencing, performed at the Stanford Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine. Our goal is to facilitate small to medium-sized projects that are best served by modest numbers of sample submissions from individual users, and that are billed on a per-lane basis.

Contact

Arend Sidow, PhD, arend@stanford.edu, (650) 498-7024

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Stanford Functional Genomics Facility (SFGF)

The Stanford Functional Genomics Facility (SFGF) is a service center in the Stanford School of Medicine providing the following genomics services:

  • High-throughput Sequencing (Illumina)
  • Library Generation for Illumina High-throughput Sequencing
  • Microarray Gene Expression (Affymetrix, Agilent, Illumina)
  • QC for RNA, DNA, and High-throughput Sequencing Libraries
  • Whole Genome Genotyping (Illumina)
  • Real-time PCR gene expression, genotyping, melt, etc.
  • Sample Preps DNA and RNA extractions, Plasmid preps
  • NanoString
  • Microarrays and Microarray Printing
  • 24/7 Access to Instrumentation and Software

Authority

John Coller, PhD

Contact

microarray@stanford.edu

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Imaging

Cell Sciences Imaging Facility (CSIF)

The Cell Sciences Imaging Facility (CSIF) is a Beckman Center supported university service center that provides high resolution, state-of-the-art light and electron microscopy technologies for imaging and analyzing the molecular and structural organization of cells, tissue and bioengineered materials.  The CSIF operates two sites at Stanford University: The SOM Beckman Center CSIF and the SOE Shriram Center CSIF.  Both facility sites are open to all members of the Stanford community as well as to external academic and industry researchers (with approval of the facility Director).

Contact

Director
Jon Mulholland, jwm@stanford.edu, (650) 725-7532

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Lucas Center for Imaging

We envision that the Lucas Center will remain the creative environment for  unprecedented interdisciplinary research illuminating our understanding of human physiology and lighting the way for revolutionary advances in the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. Our mission is to advance imaging in healthcare at Stanford through technology creation and development, translational research and education.  

The Lucas Center opened in July 1992 as one of the few centers in the world with major centralized resources devoted to research in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and imaging (MRI).   The Center provides office and laboratory facilities for full-time faculty members and their team of scientific staff, postdoctoral fellows and students. We actively support collaborative and original research through building upon a long-standing and very close working relationship between the faculty and students of RSL, the Clinical Radiology Department and members of the Electrical Engineering Department often having joint seminars, journal clubs and study groups. In addition, faculty members from all groups are joint advisors to many students and have many federally funded and industry-funded collaborative research programs in place.

Our facilities are available to Stanford and non-Stanford researchers by arrangement with the Center Administrator, Jane Nguyen; use is billed on a per-hour basis.

Contact

Manager, MR Whole Body Research Systems
Anne Sawyer, amsawyer@stanford.edu, (650) 725-9697

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Neuroscience Microscopy Service

The NMS provides access to high-end, capital-intensive microscopy equipment that is often not available to individual labs.

Contact

Director of Microscopy
Andrew Olson, Ph.D., aolson6@stanford.edu, (650) 723-8818

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Stanford Center for Cognitive and Neurobiological Imaging (CNI)

The Stanford Center for Cognitive and Neurobiological Imaging (CNI) is a shared facility, dedicated to research and teaching. The Center provides resources for researchers and students used in cognitive and neurobiological sciences.

Contact

MRI Facility Manager
Laima Baltusis

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Stanford Center for Innovation and In Vivo Imaging (SCi3)

The mission of the Stanford Center for Innovation in In vivo Imaging (SCI3) is to provide access to state-of-the-art and first-of-its-kind preclinical imaging instruments to facilitate translation of research from in vitro tests to small animal investigations and clinical practice.  This enables assessments of new technologies, novel drugs/tracers, variable phenotypes and novel biological concepts in living murine models. The SCI3 center offers access to imaging equipment at three different locations: The Clark Center houses the primary SCI3 facility, with additional imaging facilities located in the Lokey Stem Cell building, Comparative Medicine Pavilion, The Shriram Center for Bio-Engineering, and the Porter Drive facility off campus. SCI3center personnel offers consultation, dedicated training and supervision for researchers and students on basic concepts and personalized use of imaging modalities available.

Contact

Director
Heike Daldrup-Link, MD

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Informatics/Computational Analysis

Computational Service and Bioinformatics Facility (CSBF)

The CSBF provides a variety of Macintosh, Windows and Linux software for scientific research and general administrative use. The CSBF obtains concurrent network licenses that work under the control of a software license manager. This allows the facility to purchase a limited number of copies of expensive software but distribute the software widely within the Stanford network thus providing a substantial savings to the individual researcher.

Researchers can gain access to these software products at a significantly lower cost, through a yearly membership in the CSBF. The CSBF also shoulders the hidden cost of installing and managing the licenses and license servers.

Contact Information

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Genetics Bioinformatics Service Center (GBSC)

Genetics Bioinformatics Service Center (GBSC) is a School of Medicine service center operated by Department of Genetics. GBSC is set up to facilitate massive scale genomics at Stanford and supports omics, microbiome, sensor, and phenotypic data types. Our facilities are available to any Stanford University researcher and Stanford affiliates unless noted otherwise.

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Parallel Computing

The Bio-X Parallel Computing Cluster is currently closed to new users. Somewhat more modest parallel computing resources are available for free (for Stanford users) on the “barley” cluster.

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Research IT Information Resources and Technology

Research IT exists to supply infrastructure, tools, and services used by researchers, patients/participants, and clinicians to collect and combine data to make discoveries and to improve human health and wellness.

Contact Information

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Miscellaneous

MCP-SINTN Engineering Shop

This shop is dedicated to assisting researchers in the Medical School with their custom instrumentation and equipment needs at an affordable price.

Contact

Engineer
David Profitt, profitt@stanford.edu, (650) 723-6478

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Stanford Microfluidics Foundry

This facility assists in the design and fabrication of Silicon replica molds and PDMS microfluidic chips. 

Contact

Director
Emre Araci, PhD, stanford.foundry@gmail.com, (650) 724-7383

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Nanotechnology

Stanford Nano Shared Facilities (SNSF)

Stanford Nano Shared Facilities (SNSF) provides shared scientific instrumentation, laboratory facilities, and expert staff support to enable multidisciplinary research and educate tomorrow’s scientists and engineers.

Nanoscale Science & Engineering (NSE) research crosses departmental boundaries and is a driving force for multidisciplinary collaborations across campus. However, many of the tools that enable NSE are not economically feasible in individual research labs. Making these tools available in shared facilities, together with staff for operations, development, maintenance, and training, enables the many research groups on campus with nano-relevant interests to pursue the most cutting-edge NSE research.

SNSF has facilities in the McCullough, Moore, Spilker and Shriram Buildings.

Services are organized into four focused areas, consisting of Nanofabrication, Electron & Ion Microscopy, X-ray & Surface Analysis and Soft & Hybrid Materials.

SNSF Contacts

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Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory (SNL)

The Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory (SNL) provides modern facilities for the characterization of materials. Instruments include high-resolution electron microscopes, X-ray diffractometers, and surface science analytical instruments. The instruments are available to internal Stanford users as well as external users from industry and academia. 

Contact

Associate Director (Nano Shared Facilities)
Tobias Beetz, PhD, tobi@stanford.edu, (650) 721-2905

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Stanford Nanofabrication Facility (SNF)

The Stanford Nanofabrication Facility serves academic, industrial, and governmental researchers across the U.S. and around the globe. More than a lab, it's a vibrant research community. We are part of nano@stanford, under the NSF National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure program.

Contact Information

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Neurobehavior

Stanford Behavioral and Functional Neuroscience Lab (SBFNL)

As part of the Stanford Neurosciences Institute, BFNL provides  a preclinical discovery platform for CNS target validation in preclinical in vivo and in vitro models. Our well validated neurobehavioral assessment tools in CNS disease models provide a unique platform for the screening and profiling of experimental therapeutics and genetic rodent models. We aim to accelerate the progress in both fundamental and applied studies of nervous system function. We collaborate with academic laboratories, non-profit foundations, and biopharmaceutical companies worldwide to support the understanding of human CNS disorders and develop therapeutic interventions. 

Contact

Mehrdad Shamloo, PhD, mshamloo@stanford.edu

Contacts Page

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Stanford Cognitive and Systems Neuroscience Laboratory

The Stanford Cognitive and Systems Neuroscience Laboratory (SCSNL), led by Dr. Vinod Menon, aims to transform the global landscape of psychiatry research and human health and wellness. Leveraging expertise in neuroscience, statistics, engineering, computer science, psychology, psychiatry, and neurology, researchers in the lab use advanced multimodal brain imaging techniques, novel computational and statistical methods, and clinical-behavioral assays to investigate the architecture, function, and development of the human brain in psychiatric and neurological disorders. Clinical disorders currently under investigation include learning disabilities, autism, ADHD, anxiety and mood disorders, and schizophrenia.

Contacts

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Patient Sample Analysis

FACS/Immunoassay

Accordion content 1.

Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting Facility (FACS)

Stanford Shared FACS Facility has been providing the Stanford research community with flow cytometry instrumentation and expertise since 1989.  This Shared Resource lab provides operator-assisted analyzer and sorter use, as well as training and support for user instrument operation.

Facility Staff

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Human Immune Monitoring Center (HIMC)

HIMC provides standardized, state-of-the-art immune monitoring assays at the RNA, protein, and cellular level, as well as archiving, reporting, and data mining support for clinical and translational studies. In partnership with the research community, we also work to test and develop new technologies for immune monitoring.

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Stanford Blood Center

The generosity of Stanford Blood Center donors is not only measured by lives enhanced today, it is measured by the discoveries our scientists are enabled to make, helping future generations even further. From transfusions to transplants to biotechnology for the future, your blood has amazing potential. Give blood for life!

Since 1978, Stanford Blood Center has been providing tailored blood products and samples, as well as clinical trial services, for its own staff of primary investigators as well as researchers at Stanford University, in our partner hospitals and in the greater biotech community.

Contact

650-723-7831

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Stanford Functional Genomics Facility (SFGF)

The Stanford Functional Genomics Facility (SFGF) is a service center in the Stanford School of Medicine providing the following genomics services:

  • High-throughput Sequencing (Illumina)
  • Library Generation for Illumina High-throughput Sequencing
  • Microarray Gene Expression (Affymetrix, Agilent, Illumina)
  • QC for RNA, DNA, and High-throughput Sequencing Libraries
  • Whole Genome Genotyping (Illumina)
  • Real-time PCR gene expression, genotyping, melt, etc.
  • Sample Preps DNA and RNA extractions, Plasmid preps
  • NanoString
  • Microarrays and Microarray Printing
  • 24/7 Access to Instrumentation and Software

Authority

John Coller, PhD

Contact

microarray@stanford.edu

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Tissue Procurement Shared Resource

The objective of the Tissue Procurement Shared Resource facility is to procure and provide needed tissue specimens to SCI investigators to support cancer-related research.  

Contact

Tissue Bank Manager
dleu@stanford.edu

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Translational Applications Service Center (TASC)

Translational Applications Service Center (TASC) facility in the Department of Medicine is a fee-for-service research laboratory serving the Stanford University scientific community, as well as outside investigators. It offers a variety of analytical services, technical and scientific consulting and training, as well as pay-per-use research equipment, which allow investigators shared access to technologies that support innovative research in translational medicine. By providing centralized oversight and infrastructure for conducting translational research studies, as well as access to high-quality, cost-efficient, state-of-the-art proteomic, molecular and genomic technologies, TASC's overall mission is to serve as a comprehensive resource for accelerating the pace of advances in patient therapy and diagnosis by enhancing basic research in the early stages of translation to the clinical setting.

We can provide scientific expertise and support for standard and customized assays, from the initial study design to the final interpretation and statistical analysis of experimental data. Our standard services also include clinical sample acquisition, processing and archival for conducting inter-disciplinary translational research applications.

Contact

Director of TASC
Joanna Liliental, PhD, jlili@stanford.edu, (650) 736-1285

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Preclinical Translational Services

High Throughput Bioscience Center (HTBC)

This high-throughput screening (HTS) laboratory allows Stanford researchers and others to discover novel modulators of targets that otherwise would not be practical in industry. The center incorporates instrumentation (purchased with NCRR NIH Instrumentation grant numbers S10RR019513, S10RR026338, and S10OD025004), databases , compound libraries , and personnel whose previous sole domains were in industry.

The High-Throughput Bioscience Center's mission is to provide researchers at Stanford with the ability to run high-throughput chemical , siRNA , cDNA , and high-content screens for the purpose of drug and/or target discovery.

Authority

David E. Solow-Cordero, Ph.D.

Contact Information

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Stanford Behavioral and Functional Neuroscience Lab (SBFNL)

As part of the Stanford Neurosciences Institute, BFNL provides  a preclinical discovery platform for CNS target validation in preclinical in vivo and in vitro models. Our well validated neurobehavioral assessment tools in CNS disease models provide a unique platform for the screening and profiling of experimental therapeutics and genetic rodent models. We aim to accelerate the progress in both fundamental and applied studies of nervous system function. We collaborate with academic laboratories, non-profit foundations, and biopharmaceutical companies worldwide to support the understanding of human CNS disorders and develop therapeutic interventions. 

Contact

Mehrdad Shamloo, PhD, mshamloo@stanford.edu

Contacts Page

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Stanford Biomaterials and Advanced Drug Delivery Laboratory (BioADD)

The Biomaterials and Advanced Drug Delivery (BioADD) Laboratory is a cutting edge research facility founded in 2010 on the Stanford University Medical Campus. Today’s problems in drug design require complex answers to achieve effective delivery and treatment. The Stanford BioADD Lab helps to solve these problems with advanced modern technology and innovative solutions. Specializing in the creation of biomaterials and drug delivery agents, the lab lends its expertise toward designing and analyzing biomaterials, developing drug delivery devices and formulations, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies, and developing smart materials for biomedical applications.

Contact

Director
Jayakumar Rajadas, PhD, jayraja@stanford.edu, (650) 724-7710

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Stanford University Mass Spectrometry (SUMS)

Beyond making available state-of-the-art, user-friendly facilities and services, the laboratory enables education, methods development, and new applications development, designed to meet the rapidly evolving needs of researchers. Due to the essential information that mass spectrometry provides to researchers in the fields of the physical and life sciences, medicine, and engineering, the laboratory serves as an “intellectual watering hole” at the crossroads of diverse disciplines.

Contact

People

Visit the Site

Translational Applications Service Center (TASC)

Translational Applications Service Center (TASC) facility in the Department of Medicine is a fee-for-service research laboratory serving the Stanford University scientific community, as well as outside investigators. It offers a variety of analytical services, technical and scientific consulting and training, as well as pay-per-use research equipment, which allow investigators shared access to technologies that support innovative research in translational medicine. By providing centralized oversight and infrastructure for conducting translational research studies, as well as access to high-quality, cost-efficient, state-of-the-art proteomic, molecular and genomic technologies, TASC's overall mission is to serve as a comprehensive resource for accelerating the pace of advances in patient therapy and diagnosis by enhancing basic research in the early stages of translation to the clinical setting.

We can provide scientific expertise and support for standard and customized assays, from the initial study design to the final interpretation and statistical analysis of experimental data. Our standard services also include clinical sample acquisition, processing and archival for conducting inter-disciplinary translational research applications.

Contact

Director of TASC
Joanna Liliental, PhD, jlili@stanford.edu, (650) 736-1285

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Proteomics

Protein and Nucleic Acid Facility (PAN)

The Protein and Nucleic Acid (PAN) Facility is a multifaceted biotechnology fee-for-service laboratory. The PAN Biotechnology Facility offers a diverse array of instrumentation and technical capabilities and plays a significant consultative role in the application of these technologies to basic science projects.

Visit the Site

Stanford University Mass Spectrometry (SUMS)

Beyond making available state-of-the-art, user-friendly facilities and services, the laboratory enables education, methods development, and new applications development, designed to meet the rapidly evolving needs of researchers. Due to the essential information that mass spectrometry provides to researchers in the fields of the physical and life sciences, medicine, and engineering, the laboratory serves as an “intellectual watering hole” at the crossroads of diverse disciplines.

Contact

People

Visit the Site

Translational Applications Service Center (TASC)

Translational Applications Service Center (TASC) facility in the Department of Medicine is a fee-for-service research laboratory serving the Stanford University scientific community, as well as outside investigators. It offers a variety of analytical services, technical and scientific consulting and training, as well as pay-per-use research equipment, which allow investigators shared access to technologies that support innovative research in translational medicine. By providing centralized oversight and infrastructure for conducting translational research studies, as well as access to high-quality, cost-efficient, state-of-the-art proteomic, molecular and genomic technologies, TASC's overall mission is to serve as a comprehensive resource for accelerating the pace of advances in patient therapy and diagnosis by enhancing basic research in the early stages of translation to the clinical setting.

We can provide scientific expertise and support for standard and customized assays, from the initial study design to the final interpretation and statistical analysis of experimental data. Our standard services also include clinical sample acquisition, processing and archival for conducting inter-disciplinary translational research applications.

Contact

Director of TASC
Joanna Liliental, PhD, jlili@stanford.edu, (650) 736-1285

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Structural Biology

Stanford Magnetic Resonance Laboratory (SMRL)

The Stanford Magnetic Resonance Laboratory is a research facility within the Stanford University School of Medicine. The goal of this facility is to provide research instrumentation and expertise in the area of solution-phase, high resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. 

The research focus of the facility is primarily in the study of biological macromolecules. Collaborating researchers also use the facility to study properties of polymers, minerals, soils, and for NMR imaging experiments. 

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Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL)

The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), a Directorate of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), is an Office of Science(link is external) User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)(link is external) by Stanford University. Located in Menlo Park, California, SLAC is a multi-program national laboratory exploring frontier questions in photon science, astrophysics, biochemistry, material science, particle physics and accelerator research. SLAC engages in fundamental research which is published or shared broadly with the scientific community. The DOE Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time.

The SSRL SPEAR3 3-GeV, high-brightness third-generation storage ring, upgraded in 2004, operates at 500 mA in top-off mode, with high reliability and low emittance. SSRL's extremely bright x-rays are a resource for researchers to study our world at the atomic and molecular level, leading to major advances in energy production, environmental remediation, nanotechnology, new materials, biology and medicine. SSRL provides unique educational experiences and serves as a vital training ground for future generations of scientists and engineers.

SSRL 2017 Year in Review

SSRL Strategic Plan 2018-2022

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Veterinary Services and Animal Models

Administrative Panel on Laboratory Animal Care (APLAC)

The APLAC’s Mission

Why are animals used at Stanford?

Animal studies play a vital role in advancing science and finding new and improved ways of fighting serious diseases. Stanford University is committed to the responsible care and use of animals in research. Stanford complies with all federal and state regulations governing the humane care and use of laboratory animals, including the USDA Animal Welfare Act, and our Assurance of Compliance with PHS Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. The laboratory animal care program at Stanford is accredited by the Association for the Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care (AAALAC International). We have made animal welfare a top priority in all of our research efforts.

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Animal Diagnostic Laboratory

The Animal Diagnostic Laboratory in the Veterinary Service Center provides veterinary clinical pathology support for investigators using animal research models.

Services include hematology, clinical chemistry, serology, cytology and fluid analysis, microbiology and parasitology. Specialized testing including immunologic and endocrine assays is available. Please use the links at the left of the page to access additional information.

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Animal Histology Services

The Department of Comparative Medicine's Animal Histology Services (AHS) provides a broad range of histological techniques that include standard processing and embedding methods as well as processing of larger specimens, serial and step sectioning, sectioning of frozen specimens, and a variety of staining techniques. 

We offer special orientation of tissues to match images from MRI, CT and other imaging modalities or for unbiased stereology. In addition to routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, we offer special stains to highlight infectious agents (bacteria, fungi), cellular elements, different cell types, and tissue matrix components. Also, we offer immunohistochemical assays.

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Comparative Medicine

Comparative Medicine is a distinct discipline of experimental medicine that uses animal models of human and animal disease in translational and biomedical research. The Department of Comparative Medicine at Stanford is an academic department whose faculty teach at the undergraduate, graduate, professional and post graduate levels. 

The faculty in the Department of Comparative Medicine are basic researchers or veterinary clinician scientists, all working toward one health. Basic scientist faculty use animal models of epilepsy, neuronal reorganization and recovery after injury, and cortical neuronal circuitry to study physiological and pathophysiological processes. Our basic science faculty also explore strategies to protect women from acquiring HIV and other genital infections.  The veterinary clinical faculty in the Department of Comparative Medicine research interests focus on topics pertaining to laboratory animal and wildlife health, and on animal models of human disease. The species studied are diverse, ranging from rodents to the African Clawed frog.

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Stanford Center for Innovation and In Vivo Imaging (SCi3)

The mission of the Stanford Center for Innovation in In vivo Imaging (SCI3) is to provide access to state-of-the-art and first-of-its-kind preclinical imaging instruments to facilitate translation of research from in vitro tests to small animal investigations and clinical practice.  This enables assessments of new technologies, novel drugs/tracers, variable phenotypes and novel biological concepts in living murine models. The SCI3 center offers access to imaging equipment at three different locations: The Clark Center houses the primary SCI3 facility, with additional imaging facilities located in the Lokey Stem Cell building, Comparative Medicine Pavilion, The Shriram Center for Bio-Engineering, and the Porter Drive facility off campus. SCI3center personnel offers consultation, dedicated training and supervision for researchers and students on basic concepts and personalized use of imaging modalities available.

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Director
Heike Daldrup-Link, MD

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Stanford Behavioral and Functional Neuroscience Lab (SBFNL)

As part of the Stanford Neurosciences Institute, BFNL provides  a preclinical discovery platform for CNS target validation in preclinical in vivo and in vitro models. Our well validated neurobehavioral assessment tools in CNS disease models provide a unique platform for the screening and profiling of experimental therapeutics and genetic rodent models. We aim to accelerate the progress in both fundamental and applied studies of nervous system function. We collaborate with academic laboratories, non-profit foundations, and biopharmaceutical companies worldwide to support the understanding of human CNS disorders and develop therapeutic interventions. 

Contact

Mehrdad Shamloo, PhD, mshamloo@stanford.edu

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Transgenic, Knockout and Tumor Model Center (TKTC)

To address the molecular basis of human diseases and develop novel therapeutic strategies for their treatment, an important component is to create animal models that can recapitulate human disease states. Partly supported by funds from the Stanford Cancer Institute, since 1996 the Transgenic, Knockout and Tumor model Center (TKTC) has produced in vitro and in vivo models to support research in a variety of different fields and applications.

Our goal is to provide the scientific community inside and outside of Stanford with the intellectual and technical expertise to develop the right “lever” they need to address their research questions.

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Veterinary Service Center (VSC)

The functions of the VSC include:

provision of animal husbandry services provision of veterinary care consultation for animal model development procurement, acquisition, and exportation of animals for research and teaching provision of technical services, training, and specialized facilities and equipment to facilitate animal research provision of veterinary clinical pathology and animal histology support for animal research models

Contact

Associate Director of the Veterinary Service Center and the Director of the Diagnostic Laboratory
Dr. David Bentzel, dbentzel@stanford.edu, 650-498-1560

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Created: 03.03.21
Updated: 04.12.21