Space Inventory (Complete)

1. Overview

1.1 About Space Inventory

Contact

David Ida

Sr Space Analyst

Cost and Management Analysis

(650) 725-7565

1. Overview

Stanford University uses the iSpace system to track the occupancy and use of all the rooms in Stanford on campus buildings and in off campus buildings leased for use by Stanford organizations. In addition to tracking the academic campus, we upload all the student housing/dining buildings and the Stanford Hospitals and Clinics buildings (due to the overlapping occupancy by the School of Medicine).   Every two years Stanford conducts an official Space Inventory to update the database for new space, renovated/re-purposed space, demolished space and department moves around the campus. The inventory is a full census of every room during which each department must review and update the information related to the occupancy and use of their space during the fiscal year. This process is known as “Updating and Certifying the Space Inventory”.

The data is of great importance to many groups on campus. Much of the analysis of space is for internal use.  For example, the School of Medicine (a formula school) uses the data in their annual budgeting process and in space planning. And, of course, EH&S, PMO, and many others depend on the accuracy of the data in accomplishing their work. Perhaps, more importantly, the data supports negotiations with the Federal Government of the indirect Cost Rate that is applied to sponsored projects. A large portion of the indirect cost recovered by the University depends on the Space Inventory. The Cost and Management Analysis group (CMA) utilizes the room level functional use data in the allocation of building related costs that will impact the recovery of millions of dollars to Stanford University As a department Space Coordinator, the information you provide during this inventory of campus space is an integral part of the process for understanding how our space is being used. Therefore, the accuracy of the coding, as updated by you, is of crucial importance.  Feel free to ask questions if anything in here is unclear.

 

This document describes the policies and procedures for coding individual room usage in the Space Inventory. In addition to department occupancy and type of room, we need to know how the room is being used and track usage with Function Codes. Although not all Function Codes are relevant to all users, everyone should understand which codes apply to your department. If you have any questions about which sections of the Space Inventory Instructions are relevant to your area, please contact CMA.

The Space Inventory has several steps to be completed by the Space Coordinator: 

  1. Reviewing and updating the room data
  2. Providing for documentation as needed
  3. Certifying completion of the inventory

All space coding must be reviewed and updated as required. Changes may have occurred in your rooms that affect room coding in iSpace for the current inventory process.

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2. Working with the Cost and Management Analysis Group

CMA has increased its participation in space coding now and in the future to ensure the highest possible level of accuracy. This participation will differ depending on the type of your department: academic vs. administrative (including auxiliaries and non-Stanford entities).

A. Academic

CMA will focus its review of departmental entries primarily on the following items (versus a full census review of each department):

  • space coded in iSpace to Organized Research
  • sponsored research and cost sharing accounts with expenditures as of June 2012

B. Administrative

Prior to the archive of the iSpace data, CMA will review the functional coding reported by each department to ensure its appropriateness. Once all updates are made, each department is required to certify per the instructions below.  

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3. Documentation

Sufficient documentation to support the coding of your space must be maintained, primarily for space coded to Organized Research (OR). Documentation is important to support coding decisions in the event of audit by Internal Audit, external auditors, the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA), and/or sponsoring agencies. See Appendix C: Organized Research Documentation for detailed guidance on requirements. A form has been designed to standardize the collection/reporting of the documentation required to support the coding of Organized Research space. Completion of this form for all space coded to OR will assist CMA in its review of each department’s space. In the event of a DCAA audit, this form will reduce the impact on a department’s faculty and staff by providing written documentation. See Appendix C: Organized Research Documentation for more information about the OR documentation form.

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4. Certification Process

The certification is an acknowledgment by the department Space Coordinator that the Space Inventory was updated in accordance with the requirements set forth in these Space Inventory Instructions. Please be sure you understand these Instructions before updating your space inventory. Upon completion of your space inventory update, certify its completion (to the best of your knowledge) as follows:

  1. Print a Certification Report from iSpace for your department.
  2. Review the report to insure that all changes are reflected.
  3. If all changes are not reflected, make the necessary changes and repeat step 1.
  4. If all changes are reflected, review the changes with the Department Administrative/Financial Manager. (For SoM, Department Business Manager)
  5. After the review, sign and date the report, managers may also sign. (For SoM, Department Finance Administrator (the DFA) will sign and date the report.)
  6. You must retain the signed report in your file in the event of an audit.  This is the only evidence of certification accepted by Internal Audit and the Government.
  7. Notify CMA via e-mail that your space inventory update is complete.  (For SoM, Department Business Manager will do notification and cc: to Medical School Office of Facilities and Planning Services, and to Department Chair)

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5. Deadline and Notification Details

Send notification of completion and certification by: September 30 (30 days after fiscal year close) Send notification of completion to: For All Departments (incl. SoM): DIDA@STANFORD For SoM: MEDSPACEINFO@LIST.STANFORD For Stanford Health Center: MOLLINEDO_D@HOSP  

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6. Changes and Key Points

Policy Changes

There are no major negotiated policy changes affecting space that have significantly changed these instructions from the prior issue in 2010.  However, as a result of the recent DCAA audit, accuracy and documentation is of utmost importance.   Please review the following items to insure the accuracy of your space coding.

Academic Office Space Clarification

Clarification of exceptions to Academic department’s office space (Room Type Codes 300 to 399) coding to Departmental Administration, Function Code A. See page 20.

Desk Space in Labs

Use of desk space in research labs for various activities has been identified as an item of concern by the Government. Stanford has historically been coding many research labs acknowledging non-research activities (including desk use) where the activities are a measurable level of use. We are not changing the methodology for functional coding of the research labs in this Space Inventory. 

OIA Clarification

Clarification for space occupied by visiting scholars or emeritus faculty. See OIA on page 25.

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7. Why Is Space Inventory Required?

University Tracking of Space

The primary purpose of the Space Inventory is to maintain accurate information about space owned or rented by the University. The data is of great importance to many groups on campus and is used for a variety of purposes (see Other Uses). Predominant, is the calculation of the Indirect Cost Rate that is applied to sponsored project expenditures.  The Space Inventory provides a basis for the allocation of selected indirect costs, including building and equipment depreciation costs and some operation and maintenance (O&M) costs.

Recovery of Indirect Costs

The Federal Government requires accurate calculation of the University’s Indirect Cost Rate. The calculation is performed to determine the costs of accommodating sponsored projects at Stanford University. These overhead costs can be reimbursed to Stanford by the government and other sponsors. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-21, "Cost Principles for Educational Institutions", provides the guiding principles and procedures for determining the costs applicable to work performed by colleges and universities under grants, contracts, and other agreements with the Federal Government and other sponsors. Additional guidance for Space Inventory classifications is provided by the "Post-Secondary Education Facilities Inventory and Classification Manual, 2006" (the Manual) published by the National Center for Education Statistics. Topics addressed in the Manual include Assignable Square Footage and Room Type Codes and definitions. These items are discussed in greater detail later in these Instructions. Thus, the allocation and reimbursement of building and equipment depreciation and O&M costs, a major portion of total indirect costs, is directly affected by how departments code their space. It is crucial that you be as accurate as possible in updating the space inventory so that Stanford complies with its obligations under the applicable Federal Regulations.

Other Uses and Users

 

The iSpace database contains information about buildings used for a variety of purposes, including:

  • scheduling and assigning space
  • facilities planning by the University/schools/departments
  • departmental tracking of space use
  • Energy Conservation Incentive Program
  • University Space Charge Program
  • School of Medicine (a formula school) annual budgeting and space planning

The user groups include the following:

  • Capital Planning and Management
  • University Property Administration
  • Communications Services
  • Environmental Health & Safety Office
  • Facilities Project Management
  • Federal agencies - FEMA/DOE/NSF
  • School of Medicine Facilities
  • Medical Center Accounting
  • Network for Student Information
  • Operations & Maintenance
  • Public Safety
  • Registrar's Office
  • Risk Management
  • Fire Protection Services

Given the wide range of use of iSpace data, some information requested as part of the Space Inventory is necessary to update the database but is not used in the calculation of the University’s Indirect Cost Rate. All iSpace data fields are discussed in the iSpace Reference Manual.

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8. Assistance

It is not expected that everyone will understand fully all aspects of the Space Inventory Instructions. Assistance is readily available, and we encourage you to use it. Room Numbering, Room Measurements, Floor Plans: University Departments: Dobie Howard (x3-3289) or EM: DOBIEH@BONAIR     School of Medicine: Joslyn Gray (5-8922) or EM: JPGRAY@STANFORD Stanford Health Service: David Mollinedo (x5-5958) or EM: MOLLINEDO_D@HOSP iSpace Access: University Departments: Dobie Howard (x3-3289) or EM: DOBIEH@BONAIR School of Medicine: Joslyn Gray (5-8922) or EM: JPGRAY@STANFORD Space Coding and Other Problems/Issues, call CMA: Dave Ida, Senior Space Analyst (5-7565) or EM: DIDA@STANFORD Tom Wong, Co-Director: (x3-9020) or EM: THOMAS.WONG@STANFORD

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1.2 Updating the Space Inventory

Stanford uses a database system for tracking the space inventory room information. This web-based system is called iSpace. The primary function of iSpace is to provide a simple and effective process for maintaining accurate information for each room in buildings the University owns or leases.

Contact

David Ida

Sr Space Analyst

Cost and Management Analysis

(650) 725-7565

1. Update Process

Update Process

Department Space Coordinators need to review carefully all space used by their department and update iSpace as necessary. Each respondent must:

  1. Ensure all of your departmental occupied space is coded correctly to the department’s org code in iSpace. You can review this in iSpace or on the iSpace Room FY Room Detail Report (FSM-Report A2). When finished, print the report.

  2. Ensure that the physical layout is reflected accurately on the floor plans. Floor plans on website: http\\maps.stanford.edu. Confirm that room numbers listed on the Room Detail Report and floor plans match the actual room numbers for the space. Also check the square footage of each room to determine whether it appears reasonable.

  • If it seems questionable or inaccurate, contact the appropriate person to arrange for someone to measure it.

  • For a completed renovation or new rooms, also contact the appropriate person to arrange for a floor plan update in the new configuration.

  1. Walk through your department's space (in all buildings) to verify physically each room's description and attributes. Redline the report, make notes.

  2. Carefully assess the use of space in each room for all Time Period Allocations during the fiscal year to determine the correct Room Type Code and Function Code(s). A discussion of these codes begins on

  3. Update iSpace room records for any changes found in the review and walk through process.

  4. Now you can certify your space. See Certification Process.

Accuracy Is Key, Timeliness Helps

As discussed in prior sections of these Instructions, it is crucial that individuals, who are appointed as Space Coordinators by their dean, department head or chair or director complete the Space Inventory accurately. Updated data is the sole basis for new and revised information in iSpace. We require space coordinators to update their Space Inventory on-line for changes or corrections and encourage you to do the updates as soon as possible after a change in usage occurs.

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2. iSpace System

iSpace Database

Stanford uses a database system for tracking the space inventory room information. This web-based system is called iSpace. The primary function of iSpace is to provide a simple and effective process for maintaining accurate information for each room in buildings the University owns or leases. iSpace is a perpetual inventory system and can be updated whenever a change in the use of space occurs. The system can record more than one time period of use during the fiscal year. These multiple Time Period Allocations allow for tracking changes in room occupancy or use during the fiscal year easily without resorting to room splitting or ‘averaging’ the space use.   iSpace records more than one department in a room. These multiple departments can each be shown with their percentage of use of the room without resorting to room splits. iSpace tracks the individuals who are responsible for directing the activities in each room.  This person is associated with each department in a room and is recorded in the Primary Individual field. Multiple individuals can each be shown with their percentage of occupancy in the room. Functional Use coding is now associated with the Primary Individual(s) in a room. Multiple Function Codes can each be shown with their percentage of effort in the room.

iSpace Update Access

The space inventory is accessed through iSpace and is available on-line as a web-enabled application.  Anyone with SUNet access can view data in iSpace, however, only designated Department Space Coordinators can input and/or correct data in the system.

To use iSpace, you must be granted access through your SUNet ID.  If you do not already have access, see page 4 for the appropriate contact for access and training. 

If necessary, you may update your inventory manually by noting any changes directly on your Space Inventory datasheets and sending them to CMA.  You must pre-arrange this with CMA.

A. Floor Plans

Floor plans for the University’s buildings are available at Stanford Maps and Records: Floor Plans and Space Data.

A sample iSpace Room Detail Report and floor plan is shown in Appendix D and Appendix E.

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3. Coding the Data: Definitions and Guidelines

A. Occupancy of Rooms

Occupancy by Department

The Space Inventory process tracks the use of rooms by the occupying department and responsible individuals. The system, iSpace does NOT record “ownership” of rooms. iSpace records occupancy of rooms, even if loaned or borrowed from another department. Thus, department space coordinators should ensure that the final space inventory for the department shows only the rooms that were occupied/used during the fiscal year by the department. The departments are represented by an Oracle Department Code. It is assumed that Space Coordinators are already familiar with the Org Codes at Stanford.

Occupancy by Primary Individual (PI)

In addition to the department, we track the person responsible for directing the activities (Functional Uses) within each room. This person is called the Primary Individual and is associated with each department occupying the room. There may be more than one individual per department recorded by their percentage share. The Primary Individual is one of the following:

  • Faculty Member, especially Principal Investigators. These individuals are tracked by name to their offices and labs.
  • Department Chair, Program Director, or School Dean. These individuals are responsible for the use of the ‘common departmental space’ and are tracked by position title, not by name.
  • Administrative Department Senior Executive (Vice Provost, Director, etc.). These individuals are responsible for all space in a non-academic department and are tracked by position title, not by individual.

Function Codes for each PI

We are now tracking the Functional Use Codes to each person responsible for directing the activities within each room.  Each identified Primary Individual will have a segregate set of one or more Functional Use Codes recorded for the specific activities related to their occupancy of the room.

Reporting Period

In the fiscal year when a full census of the space inventory is performed, department space coordinators should consider how the space was used over the entire 12-month fiscal year (September 1 through August 31) and NOT how the space is being used at the moment the space inventory is being updated.

2. Space Codes

2.1 Tracking Space Use

Contact

David Ida

Sr Space Analyst

Cost and Management Analysis

(650) 725-7565

1. Occupancy of Rooms By Department

The Space Inventory process tracks the use of rooms by the occupying department and responsible individuals. The system, iSpace does NOT record “ownership” of rooms. iSpace records occupancy of rooms, even if loaned or borrowed from another department. Thus, department space coordinators should ensure that the final space inventory for the department shows only the rooms that were occupied/used during the fiscal year by the department. The departments are represented by an Oracle Department Code. It is assumed that Space Coordinators are already familiar with the Org Codes at Stanford.

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2. Occupancy of Rooms By the Primary Individual

In addition to the department, we track the person responsible for directing the activities (Functional Uses) within each room. This person is called the Primary Individual and is associated with each department occupying the room. There may be more than one individual per department recorded by their percentage share. The Primary Individual is one of the following:

  • Faculty Member, especially Principal Investigators. These individuals are tracked by name to their offices and labs.
  • Department Chair, Program Director, or School Dean. These individuals are responsible for the use of the ‘common departmental space’ and are tracked by position title, not by name.
  • Administrative Department Senior Executive (Vice Provost, Director, etc.). These individuals are responsible for all space in a non-academic department and are tracked by position title, not by individual.

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3. Function Codes for Each PI

We are now tracking the Functional Use Codes to each person responsible for directing the activities within each room.  Each identified Primary Individual will have a segregate set of one or more Functional Use Codes recorded for the specific activities related to their occupancy of the room.

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4. Reporting Period

In the fiscal year when a full census of the space inventory is performed, department space coordinators should consider how the space was used over the entire 12-month fiscal year (September 1 through August 31) and not how the space is being used at the moment the space inventory is being updated.

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5. Shared Rooms Full Year Use

Department space coordinators must consider space use over the 12 months of the fiscal year and should code rooms based on use over that period, rather than at any one point in time. Over the course of the year a single room may have been used by more than one department and/or for more the one purpose (as defined by a Room Type Code). 

Various coding options can be used to arrive at a composite picture of each room’s use over a full 12-month period.  For instance, space that is used for more than one function at a time (e.g., Organized Research and Instruction) or that is used by more than one function at different times during the year should be coded to portray the correct percentage of use of each function. 

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6. Shared Rooms Multiple Time Period Allocations

In order to simplify the complex usage situations iSpace, can record more than one time period of use during the fiscal year. These multiple Time Period Allocations record start and stop date dates for how a room was used over time. Thus if a room has changed occupancy, Room Type or Functional Use, we can end date the current Time Period Allocation (showing the existing usage) and start a new allocation for the changed use. This eliminates the requirement for ‘room splits’ or calculating ‘actual average’ usage. Within each Time Period Allocation, iSpace allows for shared usage of a room for: multiple Departments; multiple PIs within each department; and multiple Functional Use Codes for each PI. The shared usage is recorded at each level with the estimated percentage of use for each occupant, or functional use. Thus, both simple and very complex coding situations created by real life shared usage can be accommodated easily in the system without calculations to estimate annual average use.

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7. Shared Rooms Shared Occupancy and Multiple Uses In Percentages

Within each Time Period Allocation, iSpace allows for shared usage of a room for: multiple Departments; multiple Primary Individuals (PI’s) within each department; and multiple Functional Use Codes for each PI.  The shared usage is recorded at each level with the estimated percentage of use for each occupant, or functional use.  Thus, both simple and very complex coding situations created by real life shared usage can be accommodated easily in the system without calculations to estimate annual average use.

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8. Level of Use Report

Report functional use  activity levels that are significant enough to be measurable and supportable.

The extent to which space is to be functional is dependent upon the extent it is accurate, material and supportable. Not all functional use can be directly measured; some estimating of percentage of use will be necessary. However, activities, which occur occasionally or only incidentally to the overall activities, duties, purposes, or functions of the people occupying the space, are not necessary to report. Examples include, a small portion of a sponsored project in a class lab, a student’s occasional use of laboratory space to do homework or fundraising phone calls done incidentally by faculty in their office. These Instructions attempt to define all recognized activities (in federal government terms), but you are not required to report minute nuances. The goal is supportable and material accuracy.

Note: Report Functional Use Activity levels that are significant enough to be measurable and supportable.

 

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2.2 Room Type Codes

Contact

David Ida

Sr Space Analyst

Cost and Management Analysis

(650) 725-7565

1. Types of Space Codes

In updating the Space Inventory, there are a number of data fields for each room for which information must be provided. Three data fields are the focus of this manual. The remaining data fields are identified and discussed in iSpace Reference Manual. The three elements discussed in greater detail here are:

  • Room Type Code
  • Function Code
  • Percentage of Use     

Categories 2 and 3 together comprise space functionalization.

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2. Room Type Codes

The first step in coding space is to determine the correct Room Type Code. The code tells us what kind of room this is. It is important to focus on this first step because Room Type coding influences the determination of the Function Code(s) that is (are) appropriate to the activities in the room. Each room can be generally described as one of the following types of space:

A. Unassignable Areas

Unassignable areas (Room Type Codes 010 – 079) are those portions of a building that are not available for assignment to building occupants, but are necessary for general building operation. By definition, unassignable areas consist exclusively of general circulation, public restrooms, and custodial, mechanical, and structural space.

B. Temporarily Unassignable Areas

Temporarily Unassignable areas (Room Type Codes 081 – 089) are those portions of a building that are (1) held by the provost (2) under alteration (including renovations and space waiting for renovation) or (3) unfinished or unusable.

  1. Room type code 081 can be used for inactive space held by the Provost where the actual room type codes are unknown.
  2. Space that is under alteration may be changed to room type code 082 for larger renovations where the floorplan will be completely different after the renovation with all new room numbers assigned to the space.
  3. Space that has not been finished for use (shell space) and completely unusable space should be assigned room type code 083, 084, or 085 until it is made ready for occupation.

Temporarily Unassignable space follows a 3 Month rule for functional coding.

C. Assignable Areas

Assignable areas (Room Type Codes 100 – 989) are those portions of a building that are available for assignment to building occupants. If the space changed room type during the year, the space should be coded appropriately for each proportion of time. This situation is discussed in greater detail in the “Recording Multiple Room Type and/or Department Codes” section below.

Clearly, rooms of the same or similar physical characteristics can be used for a variety of purposes. The physical characteristics of an office, a small conference room, a seminar room, and even a dormitory room are very similar, if not identical; it is the use of the room that is the distinguishing factor. Therefore, respondents should consider the primary or predominant purpose of the space when choosing the appropriate Room Type Code.

D. Room Type Classification Ranges

The Room Type Code is a 3-digit numerical code that corresponds to a description for each type of room (e.g., seminar room, class lab, office-faculty). Each room must be assigned a Room Type Code.

Room Type Classification Ranges
Descriptions Codes
Unassignable Areas 010-079
Temporarily Unassignable Areas 080-089
Assignable Areas  
Classrooms 100-199
Class Laboratories 200-249
Non-Class Laboratories 250-255
Special Lab Support 256-269
Offices 300-399
Library Facilities 400-499
Special Use Facilities 500-599
General Use Facilities 600-699
Support Facilities 700-799
Health Care Facilities 800-899
Residential Facilities 900-989

 

Clearly, rooms of the same or similar physical characteristics can be used for a variety of purposes.  The physical characteristics of an office, a small conference room, a seminar room, and even a dormitory room are very similar, if not identical; it is the use of the room that is the distinguishing factor.  Therefore, respondents should consider the primary or predominant purpose of the space when choosing the appropriate Room Type Code.

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2.3 Function Codes

Contact

David Ida

Sr Space Analyst

Cost and Management Analysis

(650) 725-7565

1. Using Function Codes

Functional coding of all rooms is a key part of the University’s compliance with federal requirements. These Function Codes designate how space is used based on the activities occurring in the space. You need to determine the functional use of all of your occupied assignable space (Room Type Code 081 or greater).

Note: Respondents should note that in iSpace and on the Inventory datasheets this data field is shown as “Functional Use Code.” 

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2. Function Code List

The following is a list of all activities and the corresponding Function Code.

Function Code

Academic Function Codes

Instruction: Function Code: I
Departmental Administration Code: A
Organized Research: Function Code: R
Departmental Research: Function Code: L
Other Institutional Activities Code: C
Patient Care: Function Code: P

Central Support Space

 
General & Administrative Code: G
Sponsored Projects Administration Code: Q
University Libraries Code: U
Operation & Maintenance Code: M
Student Administration & Services Code: S

Auxiliaries, Hospital & Non-Stanford Entities Space

Auxiliaries, Hospital & Non-Stanford Entities Code: N
Dormitories and Housing & Dining Services Code: D

Special Use Space

Specialized Service Facility Code: F
Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) Code: O
Inactive Code: E
Temporarily Unassignable Code: X
Unassaignable Space Code: Z

 

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3. Function Code Determination

Function Codes in some cases seem fairly self evident, such as ‘Instruction’.  However, there are nuances to the activities in each Function Code as defined in the OMB A-21 document.  You should read the definitions in this section for any of the function codes that may pertain to your space depending on the type of organization you are in: Academic (with or without sponsored research), Central Support or Special Use. Everyone should also understand the policy on inactive and unusable space. The determination of room functional use is an integral step in updating your department’s space inventory. Use a reasonable best method of understanding the activities in a given room. Labs and other rooms that are coded with multi-functional use will require a higher level of scrutiny. Rooms that have multiple activities with different functions codes will need to have the level of effort of each of these activities estimated and expressed as a percentage of the total use of the room. After you become familiar with the definitions of the applicable function codes, one of several methods may be employed to decide each room’s function code and corresponding percentage of use:

  1. Interview(s) with the responsible and most knowledgeable person - for labs this would be the Principal Investigator (faculty).
  2. Interview(s) with the room occupant(s).
  • For example, Lab managers, Research Assistants and/or Teaching Assistants (TA) would know the activities in the room.
  1.  General knowledge of the activities performed in the room.
  2. Use logs, staff rosters, room assignment lists, etc.
  3. Analysis of revenue (for selected service centers or labs that charge to use their facilities, e.g., Stanford Nanofabrication Facility).  See page 35 for a detailed discussion of functional coding for service centers.

When interviewing people about room use, you must take care to ensure that the defined functional activities are clearly understood by the interviewees to ensure proper allocation of the space by Function Code.

You must keep verifiable documentation (including interview notes) as to how the room coding was determined in the event that an additional review or audit is required of any particular space.  See Appendix C for detailed guidance on documentation for Organized Research.

For most of the Function Codes, funding of the activities is not a factor in determining the coding. For Organized Research and Departmental Research however, both funding and the nature of the activities in the space must be considered when coding rooms used for research at Stanford University. Of particular interest is the coding of space used in the conduct of Organized Research (Sponsored and University research). To begin with, you must have one or more funded sponsored projects ongoing in the space to justify the functional coding to Organized research. So the source of funding for the research helps determine the coding, but may need additional clarification. External funds are always Organized Research; but internal funding (including gifts) may be used to support Organized Research (OR) or Departmental Research (DR) based on additional criteria. More importantly, the space should be coded in a manner consistent with the functional activities taking place in the room(s).

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4. Space Coding Examples

Let’s look at aspects of these concepts.  First, the space coding should not be based solely on the salary funding of the person(s) occupying the space.  To illustrate this…

A. Example 1: Research Assistant With Split Salary

A research lab used 100% for Dr. Smith’s NIH-funded research.  The sole occupant of the lab is a Research Assistant (RA) who receives part of his salary from the NIH-funded grant and the remainder from a department fellowship.  Per discussions with Dr. Smith and the RA, it is determined that while in the lab the RA’s activities were all in support of the sponsored project and as such, are 100% Organized Research.  In this example, the occupant’s split salary funding is not an accurate reflection of this room’s activity, and the functional coding of this room should be 100% OR.

B. Example 2: Lab with two Sources of Funding

A laboratory room is used solely for research and is funded 80% by an external sponsor(s) and 20% by the department operating budget. 

If the operating budget portion supports the sponsored research activities:

  1. During the active sponsored project’s period of performance, the room should be coded 100% to Organized Research.
  2. Before or after the active sponsored project’s period of performance (except for cost overruns), the room should be coded 100% to Departmental Research (DR) for unsponsored period of time.

If the operating budget portion does NOT support the sponsored research (it is for activities that are unrelated to any sponsored projects), the room should be coded 80% to OR and 20% to DR.

In this example, the estimated level of effort for the activities of OR and DR may not be exactly the same as the funding levels. If so, you would use the estimated effort to allocate the percentage of use of the space to OR and DR.

C. Example 3: Looking at Activities in a Room With a Single Source of Funding

A laboratory room is used for a sponsored research project. Is the room 100% OR? At first glance, yes. However, looking a little further... The PI, a technician, and two graduate RAs occupy the room. The PI also teaches, but the PI’s presence in the lab is to perform the research, not to grade papers, which the PI commonly does in his or her office. The RAs and technician are present to perform research for the PI. So far, so good… However, in this example, the RAs are also TAs and hold a scheduled study lab session for their class in this lab room. Any non-research activity, if it occurs, should also be reported by function in the room coding. Thus a portion of the room use should to be coded to Instruction, if measurable, even though the funding of the room is all through the sponsored project. As with all functional reporting, measurable means occurring with regularity rather than sporadically in order to estimate a percentage of use.

D. Documentation

You must keep verifiable documentation (including interview notes) as to how the room coding was determined in the event that an additional review or audit is required of any particular space.

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5. Room Activities vs. Salary Funding

The space coding should not be based solely on the salary funding of the person(s) occupying the space.

A. Example

A research lab used 100% for Dr. Smith’s NIH-funded research. The sole occupant of the lab is a RA who receives part of his salary from the NIH-funded grant and the remainder from a department fellowship. Per discussions with Dr. Smith and the RA, it is determined that while in the lab the RA’s activities were all in support of the sponsored project and as such, are 100% Organized Research. In this example, the occupant’s split salary funding is not an accurate reflection of this room’s activity, and the functional coding of this room should be 100% OR.

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6. Academic Non-Office Space

Non-office space should be coded according to the functional use activities occurring in the room. Much of the multiuse space is under the responsibility of a named individual who directs the activities in specific rooms and can specify these activities. Some space used in support of another specific use room may be coded differently than the supported room because the use is more focused. For example, labs with desks may have instructional activity that is not occurring in the lab support rooms. For broader shared space (such as glasswash, equipment, or storage), consideration should be given not only to how the space is used but also to who customarily accesses it. Storage areas that support a department should be functionally coded based on the activity for which the contents are used.

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7. Academic Office Space

Stanford University’s policy is that all academic office space (Room Type Codes 300 - 399) will be coded initially to Departmental Administration to facilitate the space inventory process and ensure accuracy in reporting the activities that are occurring. During the calculation of the University’s indirect cost rate, this space will be assigned to the other activities, e.g., Instruction, Organized Research, Student Services, based on each department’s salary distribution to those activities. See Departmental Administration for more details and exceptions.

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3. Function Code Definitions

3.1 Academic Function Codes

The Academic areas are those in which the major activities of the University occur, specifically, instruction and research, as well as various supporting activities. By extension, one can view all other areas (G&A, Housing, O&M, etc.) as facilitating Stanford’s academic functions.

Contact

David Ida

Sr Space Analyst

Cost and Management Analysis

(650) 725-7565

1. Instruction: Function Code I

Instruction space is used for the teaching and training activities of an institution. Instruction includes all teaching and training activities whether they are offered for credits toward a degree or certificate or on a non-credit basis, and whether they are offered through regular academic departments or separate divisions (such as a summer program or extension program). In research labs, Instruction currently would include time spent by a graduate student working specifically on their dissertation, performing teaching assistant activities or doing home work at their desk space that is not part of a sponsored research activity. Instruction does not include research training that is done as a part of sponsored research.

Administrative time expended in support of Instruction responsibilities, such as grading papers, constitutes time spent on Instruction. The exception is when the activities occur in office space (Room Type Codes 300 – 399); office space in academic departments is coded to Departmental Administration.

Instruction also includes Sponsored Instruction and training activities and Other Sponsored Activities, which are externally sponsored (see below).

Instruction thus encompasses the following:

  • General instruction
  • Summer Session instruction
  • Continuing Studies instruction (inc. SoM Continuing Medical Education)
  • Residential Education Program
  • Center for Professional Development
  • Primary Care Associate Program (instructional activities)
  • SoM Residency Programs oversight and administration
  • Sponsored Instruction and training (see below)
  • Other Sponsored Activities (see below)

A. Sponsored Instructions and Training (SI)

SI means specific instructional or training grant activity (excluding “Research Training Grants”) funded by an external sponsor such as the federal, state, or local government or a commercial or non-profit agency. (All research training activity, including that sponsored by a grant, should be coded as OR.)

B. Other Sponsored Activities (OSA)

OSA means programs and projects funded by federal and non-federal agencies and organizations for activities other than research or training (which are included in OR or SI, respectively). Included in this category are travel grants, conferences, public service projects, health service programs, exhibits, or similar projects.

Examples of OSA include:

  • CCRMA – Computer Music
  • Center for Biomedical Ethics
  • California Arts Council

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2. Departmental Administration: Function Code A

Departmental Administration (DA) occurs in all academic office space (Room Type Codes 300 – 399) and some multiple-use rooms (e.g., stockrooms, shops, lounges) which service or provide support to academic school/department operations. This space is recognized as administrative or supporting service areas that benefit multiple departmental activities. DA activities support more than one functional activity in the department in proportions that cannot be readily approximated into separate functional activities.

Currently, by policy definition, we are not surveying academic office space;  All academic departments should code office space to 100% DA, not according to the activities taking place in the office space. Thus, even if office space is used 100% in support of Organized Research, it should be coded as DA.

During the calculation of the University’s indirect cost rate, this space will be re-assigned to the other activities, e.g., Instruction, Research, Department Administration, etc. based on each department’s salary distribution to those activities.

Exceptions

  • Because of their budgeting methodology, the School of Medicine will still continue to survey office space and code with the specific activities occurring during the year. (CMA will normalize this when calculating the IDC proposal.)
  • Patient Care activities should be coded to function code ‘P’.
  • Faculty effort expended in support of fund raising or consulting to non-government entities should be coded as Other Institutional Activities, Function Code ‘C’.
  • Visiting scholars and emeritus faculty.

Also, if the space was Inactive or Temporarily Unassignable for any portion of the year, DA may not be the appropriate functional code.  See detailed instructions on coding Inactive or Temporarily Unassignable space.

In addition, department general service areas are normally coded in whole or in part to Departmental Administration. Examples include the following:

  • mail room (except department student mailboxes coded to Instruction)
  • general storage room
  • lounge area
  • merchandising space (e.g., vending machines)

Proposal writing is Departmental Administration if it is to acquire a grant or contract; proposal writing is OIA if it is to obtain a gift.

A. Food Facilities

Facilities within academic buildings used for food preparation and service that are not operated by an outside entity are usually coded to Departmental Administration. These facilities exist to provide service to the various people engaged in or supporting the academic functions carried on in and around the buildings which house the food facilities. By contrast, if a food facility is located within a department area that is exclusively research, and the food facility is accessed primarily by people in that department as an extension meeting area, then it should also be coded to research. The facility is function-specific in this case, rather than broadly supportive of multiple activities or functions.

Examples of food facilities in academic buildings that are operated by outside entities (coded to AHN), or run by Dining Services (coded to R&DE) follow:

  • Arrillaga Alumni Center (The Café)
  • Beckman (Beckman Bistro)
  • Cantor Museum (Cool Café)
  • CCSR (Luttiken’s Deli)
  • Clark Center (Nexus, Peet’s Coffee)
  • Crown Quadrangle (Law Café)
  • Cubberley (Cubberley Café)
  • Huang Engineering (Ike’s Place)
  • Jordan Hall (Thai Cafe)
  • Knight Management Center (Arbuckle Dining Pavilion, Coupa Cafe)
  • Packard Electrical Engineering (Bytes Café)
  • Psychiatry Building (Garden Cafe)
  • Student Union (Axe & Palm)
  • Terman Engineering (Ciao Café)
  • Tressider Memorial (Union Square, Coho, Treehouse, Subway, Jamba)
  • Wallenberg (Olives)
  • Y2E2 (Coupa Café)

In all cases, these food facilities exclude any student lounge area, see below.

B. Lounge Areas

Lounge areas usually will be coded to Departmental Administration because they are managed by an academic department and benefit the department’s multiple functions as a whole.  The use of lounge areas is not solely linked to the availability of food; lounges are often used late into the night, long after the food services close. These areas may provide food services (e.g., vending machines), but they also provide places frequented for study and for meetings related to instructional or research assignments. For example, the GSB lounge area was specifically designed to accommodate large groups of students engaged in group projects. If the lounge area is function-specific, for example, surrounded by space coded to Organized Research and is used primarily by people engaged in that sponsored research, then the lounge area itself should also be coded to Organized Research. This is especially true when there are restrictions on consumption of food in the labs.

C. Departmental Libraries

These library spaces are used and maintained by the department only. The room is neither part of the Main University Library System nor one of the Coordinate Libraries. Departmental Libraries are most often coded as Departmental Administration.

D. Proposal Writing Occurring in Non-Office Space

Proposal writing is Departmental Administration if it is to acquire a grant or contract; proposal writing is Other Institutional Activities if it is to obtain a gift.

E. Inactive or Temporarily Unassignable Space

If the space was Inactive or Temporarily Unassignable for any portion of the year, DA may not be the appropriate functional code. For more information, review detailed instructions on coding Inactive or Temporarily Unassignable space.

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3. Organized Research: Function Code R

Organized Research (OR) space is used for research and development activity that is either Sponsored Research or University Research as defined in Stanford’s policy on “Categories of Sponsored Projects” (Research Policy Handbook 12.2).

A. Sponsored Research

Sponsored Research comprises research activities performed in accordance with a grant, contract or cooperative agreement from an external organization, i.e. federal/state agencies, corporations, foundations or other agencies. These external awards to Stanford are for the faculty to support their research activities and are separately budgeted and accounted for in the Oracle system. Sponsored research also includes activities involving the training of individuals in research techniques (commonly called research training) where such activities utilize the same facilities as other research and development activities. These activities may be on a formal “Research Training Grant” or a part of the lab efforts. Other types of Sponsored Projects include:

  • A cooperative agreement is called a Research Participation Agreement (RPA). An RPA is a form of sponsored project in which services of University personnel, academic facilities, and/or laboratory equipment are employed on behalf of parties not otherwise affiliated with the University as faculty, staff or students. An RPA is different from other forms of sponsored research projects in that a significant portion of the responsibility for the intellectual direction, interpretation and/or outcome of the work rests with the outside user.
  • Industry sponsored clinical trials involving human subjects where the objective is testing new drugs, devices or treatments, or data collection to enhance safety and efficacy of drugs or treatments.

OR does not include Sponsored Instruction (SI) or Other Sponsored Activities (OSA).

B. University Research

University Research is research activity supported by one of the following:

Committed cost sharing expenditures borne by Stanford that directly support externally sponsored research and development awards,

Funding that is derived from institutional funds (e.g., gifts, endowment income, interest income, technology licensing income, operating budget) that is awarded through a competitive application and award process, and the research activity has two or more characteristics similar to an externally sponsored research award such as:

  1. A defined statement of work.
  2. Detailed financial accountability with a line item budget detailing expenditures by activity, function, and project period.
  3. A specific commitment regarding deliverables and the level of personnel effort.
  4.  A formal report or response that summarized results or conclusions.

University funding used to cover cost overdrafts of externally sponsored research and development projects at the end of the project performance period.

It is important to note the distinction for space used in conducting Organized Research; it is the activities occurring in the room that determine whether the space should be coded to Organized Research, not just the source of the funding. The source of funding for the research project helps determine the coding, but may need additional clarification. External funds are always Organized Research; but internal funding (including gifts) may be Organized Research or Departmental Research based on additional criteria. Funding of Organized Research is primarily through the award for a sponsored project or the internal University research funding (including any committed cost sharing by Stanford to an external award). However, faculty members may use their other non-sponsored funds (seed money, gifts, department budget, etc.) to cover costs incurred on behalf of externally or University sponsored research above the project commitment. This faculty donated effort or other direct costs above that agreed to as part of the award constitutes non-binding additional time or materials and is called ‘Voluntary Uncommitted Cost Sharing’.

As a simple example, if a professor performs research that is funded by the NIH and has a research assistant that is paid partially by the grant and partially by the department operating budget or fellowship, but the activities in the lab are all performed in support of the sponsored project, the space related to that project would be coded to Organized Research.

What about Proposal writing?

Proposal writing is Departmental Administration if it is to acquire a grant or contract; proposal writing is OIA if it is to obtain a gift.

How do I code Visiting Scholars?

If a visiting scholar is working (full- or part-time) on a Stanford research project or teaching, then the space occupied should be assigned the appropriate percentage to all applicable function codes (OR, DR, or I).  However, if a visiting scholar has come to the University with his/her own funding and has been provided space as a courtesy, then the room occupied should be coded the appropriate percentage to Function Code “C” (OIA).

How do I code Emeritus Faculty?

If an emeritus faculty is working (full- or part-time) on a Stanford research project or teaching, then the space occupied should be assigned the appropriate percentage to all applicable function codes (OR, DR, or I).  However, if an emeritus faculty has been provided space as a courtesy, then the room occupied should be coded the appropriate percentage to Function Code “C” (OIA).

C. When Administrative Activities are Coded to Organized Research

Non-office space, when used for administrative activities is coded to Organized Research as follows.

Research participant’s administrative time expended in support of Organized Research responsibilities, such as completing a quarterly report for a federal grant, constitutes time spent on Organized Research and the corresponding space should be coded to OR. Other administrative activities may be performed in support of research (for example: the accounting for grants and contracts, filling research positions and ordering materials).  These activities may support one or more sponsored project(s); if you can identify the benefiting sponsored project(s), the corresponding space should be coded to Organized Research.

Note: coding the space used for these activities does not fall under the constraints for direct charging to projects under the University’s “Charging for Administrative and Technical Expenses” policy.

Separate or distinct organizations established to perform administrative services for contracts and grants are in Sponsored Projects Administration. It may be helpful to note, the Oracle Financial System distinguishes Organized Research s by the Award field: Awards in the range Pxxxx to Vxxxx are sponsored projects. Awards Wxxxx are University research. In addition, you can use the Service Type Attribute field to sort out Sponsored/University research expenditures.

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4. Departmental Research: Function Code L

Departmental research (DR) space is used for research, development and scholarly activities that are not in support of external Sponsored Research nor competitively awarded University Research (both reported as Organized Research). This research may be funded by unrestricted operating budget, gifts by donors or affiliate program funds (i.e., any funds except an externally-funded sponsored grant, contract or cooperative agreement, or internally-funded, University-sponsored project).

Departmental Research includes:

  • on-going independent research unrelated to any Organized Research activities
  • research activities on faculty start up funds and non-competitive “seed monies” provided by schools or departments to initiate research that might later become sponsored. (Note: these funds could alternatively be used in support of sponsored activities as well.)
  • interim periods of research occurring between active sponsored projects or funded periods of performance

Departmental Research is not any of the following:

  • Committed cost sharing which may be the same activity but differs from DR in that cost sharing occurs during the active sponsored funding period and is specifically committed on sponsored project budgets. (In contrast to cost sharing, DR includes support for a research/development/scholarly activity that does not have current sponsored funding.)
  • Cost overdrafts funded by the University to cover expenditures of externally sponsored research and development projects after the end of a project performance period
  • Voluntary Uncommitted Cost Sharing  - faculty donated effort or other direct costs above that agreed to as part a sponsored award constitutes non-binding additional time or materials

Cost sharing and cost overruns are University Research, a part of OR. Note that these are Oracle Awards that start with ‘W’ (Wxxxx). Voluntary uncommitted cost sharing activities support OR. Please see the discussion of Organized Research for further distinctions.

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5. Other Institutional Activities: Function Code C

Other Institutional Activities (OIA) space is used for major activities of the University that the federal government will not allow to be charged directly or indirectly to contract and grants. OIA space includes the following:

  • Fundraising and income enhancement activities (investments), which include the following central University departments: Office of Development, Office of Technology Licensing, Stanford Management Company, Real Estate Operations.
  • School/department fundraising or proposal writing to solicit donations, gifts, or contributions (at a measurable level).
  • Faculty consulting time to non-Stanford entities (at a measurable level).
  • Visiting scholars on campus with their own funding and emeritus faculty on campus by courtesy.
  • General public relations activities (inc. Govt & Community Relations)
  • Alumni activities
  • Student organization activities. Includes the space associated with student clubs, groups, and cultural/social organizations (e.g., intramural sports, student union, student publications). This category does not include student organization facilities when they are used for instructional purposes (e.g., the Law School Moot Court and the Law School Journal).
  • Theaters and auditoriums (Stanford Events and Lively Arts) with the exception of those portions used for University purposes.
  • Museums and art galleries
  • Memorial Church and other chapels
  • Staff and Faculty Housing Programs (administration and housing)
  • Community outreach activities (SoM free clinics, etc.)
  • New Service & University Communications (by CMA policy decision)

Below are examples of commonly occurring situations of OIA within an academic department.

A. Example 1: OIA Fundraising

If space is occupied by a person (including faculty) who solicits donations and/or arranges fundraising campaigns at the department, school or University level, then the room should be coded the appropriate percentage to Function Code “C” (OIA). Proposal writing is OIA if it is to obtain a donation.

Fundraising, whether located in the central Office of Development or located in a school (i.e., fundraising through department personnel who are specifically assigned fundraising activities) is unallowable per Circular A-21. Any non-office space occupied by individuals within an academic department whose function is to perform fundraising activities should be coded to OIA. A distinction must be made as to what constitutes fundraising. Fundraising should not be confused with contract and grant development activities such as writing proposals (Departmental Administration), although both result in funds being awarded to the University. Fundraising means "organized" fundraising activities resulting in "gifts" and donations to the University. Fundraising includes financial campaigns, endowment drives, solicitation of gifts and bequests, and similar activities performed solely to raise capital or obtain contributions. These activities are performed primarily by personnel in the Office of Development and by selected individuals in certain schools (e.g., the School of Law, the School of Medicine, the Graduate School of Business, and the School of Engineering).

B. Example 2: OIA Visiting Scholars

If a visiting scholar has come to the University with his/her own funding and has been provided any space as a courtesy, then the room occupied should be coded with the appropriate use percentage to Function Code “C” (OIA). However, if a visiting scholar is working (full- or part-time) on a Stanford project or teaching, then the room occupied should be assigned the appropriate percentage to all applicable function codes (DA, DR, OR, Instruction, OIA).

C. Example 3: OIA Emeritus Faculty

If an emeritus faculty has been provided any space as a courtesy, then the room occupied should be coded with the appropriate use percentage to Function Code “C” (OIA).  However, if an emeritus faculty is working (full- or part-time) on a Stanford project or teaching, then the room occupied should be assigned the appropriate percentage to all applicable function codes (DA, DR, OR, Instruction, OIA).

D. Proposal Writing in Non-Office Space

If non-office space is occupied by a person who solicits donations and arranges fundraising campaigns at the department, school or University level, then the room should be coded the appropriate percentage to OIA. Proposal writing is considered Departmental Administration if it is to acquire a grant or contract; proposal writing is OIA if it is to obtain a gift.

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6. Patient Care: Function Code P

Note: This function code is for use by the School of Medicine only.

Patient Care activities are those associated with the diagnosis and treatment of patients, which are not related to Instruction, Departmental Research or Organized Research.  Patient Care is clinical in nature and usually reimbursed from a health-care provider. Space used for these activities is coded to Function Code P.

A. Administrative Activities in support of Patient care

Space where administrative activities occur in support of Patient Care responsibilities should be coded to Patient Care. Examples of administrative activities include: reviewing charts or dictating patient letters; patient scheduling and billing; and preparation and review of clinic budgets. (If the administrator also performed administrative activities for the academic mission (e.g. instruction and research) , these should be coded to Departmental Administration).  

B. Residency Programs

Space used for all activities related to patient treatment by a person in a residency program, e.g., interviews, reviewing charts, dictating patient letters, should also be coded as Patient Care. This does not include the faculty oversight and administration activities of the residency program.

 

Please note that apparent care of patients (both inside and outside the School of Medicine) may be associated with an sponsored project or a department-funded research project.  Non-billable care related to research with human subjects should be coded OR (Function Code “R”) or DR (Function Code “L”) respectively, not Function Code “P” (Patient Care).

C. Clinical Trials

Space used for clinical trials should be coded based on the funding of the clinical trial. In most cases this funding, when provided by a pharmaceutical company, is a sponsored project and should be coded OR (Function Code “R”).

D. Vaden Student Infirmary

Vaden Student Infirmary patient care activities are coded as “Student Administration and Services” (Function Code “S”).

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3.2 Central Support Space

Central Support Space is used for General and Administrative activities and Operation and Maintenance activities, as well as other functions, which are discussed below.

Contact

David Ida

Sr Space Analyst

Cost and Management Analysis

(650) 725-7565

1. General and Administrative: Function Code G

General and Administrative space is used for the general executive and central administrative activities (G&A) which serve the entire institution. Examples of space that is coded to G&A include the following:

  1. Various University offices, such as:
  • Office of the President
  • Office of Provost
  • Vice Provost for Institutional Planning
  • General Counsel
  • Office of the CFO
  • Faculty and Staff Services
  • Procurement Department
  1. General multi-purpose space, auditoriums and conference centers used by multiple departments across the University (all or partial):
  • Clarke Center Auditorium
  • Turing Auditorium
  • Bechtel Conference Center
  • Cypress Conf Room (Tresidder)
  • Hartley Conference Center
  • Newhall Conference Room
  • Oak Conf Room (Tresidder)
  • Wattis Conference Room

Note: University level activities are differentiated from Academic Departmental Administration.

 

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Sponsored Projects Administration (SPA) space is limited by federal definition to specific campus units established to administer sponsored projects. Presently, the only departments that should code their space to SPA are:

  • Office of Sponsored Research including Grant and Contract Accounting, Engineering Research Administration (ERA), and Research Administration Group (RMG)
  • Dean of Research (portion only)
  • Cost and Management Analysis Group

SPA space is used for administrative support efforts related to the financial, compliance, and pre-award/post-award policies and processing of sponsored projects. For example: indirect cost calculation, compliance to government requirements, proposal processing, budget development, reports to the sponsor, and changes in terms and conditions.

When these activities occur at the department level, the space associated with such activities should be reported as Departmental Administration. The exception would be for SPA activities that are chargeable to a specific contract or grant, in which case the space would be shown as OR.

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3. University Libraries: Function Code U

This function code should only include space occupied by the separately organized libraries of the Stanford University Library System and the coordinate libraries.

University Libraries

  • Cecil H. Green Library
  • J. Henry Meyer Library

Research Branch Libraries

  • Archive of Recorded Sound
  • Art & Architecture Library
  • Branner Earth Sciences Library
  • Cubberley Education Library
  • Engineering Library
  • East Asia Library
  • Falconer Biology Library
  • Geographic Information Systems at Branner
  • Harold A. Miller Marine Biology Library
  • Humanities Digital Information Services
  • Jonsson Library of Government Documents
  • Map Collections (Mitchell)
  • Mathematical and Statistics Library
  • Media Microtext Center
  • Music Library
  • Physics Library
  • Special Collections (Green Library)
  • Stanford Auxiliary Library
  • Swain Chemistry & Chemical Engineering Library

Coordinate Libraries

  • Hoover Institution Library and Archives
  • Jackson Business Library
  • Lane Medical Library
  • Robert Crown Law Library

All other libraries are departmental libraries. Departmental libraries should be coded to DA to reflect their multiple functional support to the departments that they service. If, however, you feel that this coding is inappropriate for your particular situation, please contact CMA. In all instances, departmental library space is Room Type Code 461.

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4. Operation & Maintenance: Function Code M

Operation and Maintenance (O&M) represents space devoted to the administration, supervision, operation, maintenance, preservation, and protection of the University's plant.  Space associated with the following services is included.

  • Utilities
  • Fire Protection
  • O&M Shops
  • Mail & Delivery Services
  • Environmental Health & Safety
  • Public Safety
  • Transportation Programs
  • Facilities Planning

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5. Student Administration & Services: Function Code S

 

Student services space is used for those activities necessary to bring a student to the University, to maintain appropriate records, and to provide matriculation assistance while the student is working for his/her degree. This category includes the following activities both at the University and the school/department levels:

  • Admissions
  • Registration
  • Student advising
  • Career planning
  • Vaden health services/infirmary

Note, however, that this category does not include space used for student organizations. This space would be coded to Other Institutional Activities.

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3.3 Auxiliaries, Hospital & Non-Stanford Entities Space

Auxiliaries, Hospital, and Non-Stanford Entities (AHN) related space is used for activities that are Other Institutional Activities with a specific purpose. This category applies to auxiliary enterprises, Stanford Hospitals and Clinics, and non-Stanford entities.

Contact

David Ida

Sr Space Analyst

Cost and Management Analysis

(650) 725-7565

1. Auxiliaries, Hospital & Non-Stanford Entities: Function Code N

All auxiliaries and non-Stanford entities should be coded to Function N. Examples of both auxiliaries and non-Stanford entities are shown below:

Auxiliary Enterprises

  • Alumni Association
  • Bing Nursery School
  • DAPER
  • Highwire Press (Library)
  • Media Solutions (Library)
  • Overseas Centers
  • Radio Station KZSU
  • Residential Subdivision (& Residential Leaseholders)
  • Stanford in Washington (Room & Board space only)
  • University Press
  • Video Group (News Service)
  • Welch Road Apartments

Non-Stanford Entities

  • Bike Shop
  • Bookstore
  • Carnegie Institute
  • Children’s Center of the Stanford Community (Child Care)
  • Faculty Club
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)
  • Physicians for Social Responsibility 
  • Retail entities, e.g., Wells Fargo, Jamba Juice
  • Schwab Residential Center
  • Stanford Equestrian Center
  • Stanford Historical Society
  • U.S. Post Office 

Stanford Hospital & Clinics

  • Stanford Hospital & Clinics
  • Lucille Packard Children’s Hospital

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2. Residences & Dining Services: Function Code D

Function code ‘D’ is a unique auxiliary enterprise code to identify the space used for all activities encompassed by Residential and Dining Enterprises:

  1. Residential activities include student residences, dormitories (including subcontracts like Schwab Residential Center) and administrative functions, (including Housing Assignment Services).  
  2. Dining activities encompass both residence dining and dining venues operated across the campus serving students and staff.
  3. Other space includes Conference Services and Hospitality and Auxiliary Services operations.

This code would not be used for the Residential Education program (Function Code "I") or any other space occupied by the Dean of Student Affairs Office, which should be coded to the appropriate function, which is commonly Student Services (Function Code "S"). Nor does this function include Faculty Staff Housing, see Other Institutional Activities (Function Code “C”).

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3.4 Special Use Space

Contact

David Ida

Sr Space Analyst

Cost and Management Analysis

(650) 725-7565

1. Specialized Service Facility: Function Code F

OMB’s A-21 defines “Specialized Service Facilities” (SSF) as “institutional services involving the use of highly complex or specialized facilities such as electronic computers, wind tunnels, and reactors...” Because the language in A-21 is not precise, the University has defined an SSF service center as one which meets all three of the following criteria.

  1. The center must incur annual expenses of at least one million dollars.
  2. The center must “materially” affect Stanford’s Organized Research indirect cost rate (“materially” means by greater than one-tenth of a point). 
  3. The center’s services must not be easily available from an outside vendor.

Only the School of Medicine Division of Laboratory Animal Medicine’s Veterinary Service Center (VSC) is a qualified SSF service center allowed to use this function code for their occupied space.

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2. Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC): Function Code O

This function code is used exclusively for space used in research on Stanford University campus (GLAM, Astrophysics) for contracts that are administered by SLAC (primarily DOE) and are segregated  in IDC rate calculations to a separate cost pool.

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3. Inactive Space: Function Code E

Inactive space is that which is usable and could be occupied, but voluntarily is not being used for longer than 3 consecutive months. This space should continue to be assigned its normal Room Type Code (e.g., office, lab, classroom) but be functionalized as "E" (Inactive) space.

However, if the space was/will be inactive for 3 consecutive months or less, the space should be coded based on one of the following criteria:

  • If the space was not in use prior to becoming inactive, or has transferred to a new department, the space should be coded (room type and function) based on the projected use. Example: a student office in a new building which was opened during the fiscal year will not be filled until the following quarter.
  • If the space was in use prior to becoming inactive, the space should maintain the coding (room type and function) as reported prior to its inactive status. Example: a student office that is not assigned for one quarter during the year.

A. Idle Space

Idle space is comprised of the following situations:  (1) space that is inactive, or (2) space under out of service (under renovation). An important question in the decision on how to functionally code idle space is “how long the space was/will be idle?”

  • If the space was/will be idle for 3 consecutive months or less, the space coding is dependent on the normal “activity” in the room.
  • If the space was/will be idle for longer than 3 consecutive months, the space should be coded based on the idle situation - which is either Inactive (Function Code “E”) or Out of Service (Function Code “X”).

Please see the detailed discussion on how to code Inactive or Temporarily Unassignable Space above.

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4. Temporarily Unassignable Space: Function Code X

Temporarily Unassignable is space that is temporarily not usable because those portions of a building are either (1) unfinished/unusable or (2) under alteration (including space awaiting renovation). The space may continue to be assigned its normal Room Type Code, or may be re-classed to Room Type Codes 081 – 085 for multi-room spaces where the floor plan will change. If the space was/will be temporarily unassignable for longer than 3 consecutive months, it should be coded to the appropriate room type and Function Code “X”. However, if the space was/will be temporarily unassignable for 3 consecutive months or less, the space should be coded based on one of the following criteria:

  1. If the projected functional use is known, the space should be treated as if it had been in service from the beginning of the renovation/build out and coded appropriately
  2. If the post-renovation functional coding is not known, the space may maintain the coding as reported prior to the renovation.

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5. Unassignable Space: Function Code Z

Unassignable space is portions of a building that are not available for assignment to building occupants, but are necessary for general building operation. By definition, unassignable areas consist exclusively of general circulation, public restrooms, and custodial, mechanical, and structural space.

This function code is used for all unassignable space in Room Type Codes less than 080.

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3.5 Service Centers

Stanford University has several areas within departments which, based on the nature of their work, are service centers. The two categories of service centers are Academic and Administrative; the appropriate functional coding follows.

Contact

David Ida

Sr Space Analyst

Cost and Management Analysis

(650) 725-7565

1. Academic Service Centers

Service Centers are officially recognized groups charging users for specific services. Depending upon its main users, academic service center space will usually be coded to OR, DR, AHN, or DA. To determine the appropriate Function Code(s) and percentage of use, perform the following steps:

  1. Identify the room(s) (excluding office series, Room Type Codes 300 - 399) where the service center activity occurs.
  2. Calculate the total square footage (ASF) occupied by the service center.
  3. If the total from step 2 is greater than 1,000 ASF, an analysis of the service center's revenues should be performed. The percentage of revenues by activity, (e.g., OR, DR, AHN), of the total revenues will determine the percentage of use by Function Code for the space occupied. Revenue analysis is now assisted by CMA after the year end close.
  4. If the total from step 2 is less than 1,000 ASF, you may code the room(s) identified in step 1 as 100% Departmental Administration [A(100)]. However, a revenue analysis is still the preferred methodology (Exclude copy centers).

The Academic Service Center category includes:

School of Earth Sciences

  • GES Stable Isotope Lab

School of Engineering

  • CDR CAD/Graphics Facility
  • CSD Computer Facility
  • EE Photocopy Service Center
  • Gates Building Photocopy Center
  • ME HTGL Lab Facility
  • ME Thermosciences Shop
  • ME HTGL Computer Facility

School of H&S - Sciences

  • Biological Sciences Stores
  • Chemistry NMRS Center
  • Chemistry Stockroom (managed by Fisher)
  • Physics Photocopy Center
  • Physics Stockroom
  • Physics Varian Machine Shop

Stanford Nanofacility Lab - SNL

  • Focused Ion Beam
  • Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)
  • Scanning Probe Microscope (SPM)
  • Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM)
  • X-ray Laboratory
  • XPS Laboratory

Ginzton Lab

  • Crystal Polishing Shop
  • Flexible Clean Room
  • Microfab Shop

Dean of Research

  • Mass Spectrometry
  • CNI GE MR 750 Service Center

Stanford Nanosciences Shared Facility - SNC

  • Scanning Probe Microscopy
  • FIE Nova Nano SEM
  • Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer Lab
  • JEOL 6300 Electron Beam Lithography
  • Soft Materials Facility (SMF)

School of Medicine

  • BioADD
  • Bioinformatics Resource Center
  • Cell Sciences Imaging Facility
  • Data Coordinating Center
  • Functional Genomics Facility
  • Fly Facility
  • High Throughput Facility
  • Genome Service Center
  • HIMC Human Immune Monitoring Center
  • Mouse Transgenic Research Facility
  • MRSIC (Lucas Center)
  • Neuro Gene Vector Virus Core
  • Neuroscience Microscopy
  • Protein & Nucleic Acid (PAN)
  • SBF Neuroscience Lab
  • Shared Fluorescence (FACS)
  • Stanford Magnetic Resonance Lab (SMRL)

Special Service Facility

  • Veterinary Service Center (unique function code)

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2. Administrative Service Centers

Administrative level service center space will be coded to either General and Administrative or Operation and Maintenance, depending upon its organizational affiliation. This category includes:

General & Administrative (Function Code G)

  • 
ITS – Shared Services
  • CRC – Computer Resource Consulting
  • Technology Training
  • Facilities Procurement

Operation & Maintenance (Function Code M)

  • Operation & Maintenance Shops, including Grounds
  • Labor/Event Services
  • Capital Planning & Management
  • Planning and University Architect
  • Utilities
  • Facilities Procurement

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3.6 Recording Multiple Room Type and or Department Codes

Over the course of the fiscal year a single room may have been used by more than one department and or for more than one purpose (as defined by a Room Type Code).  For major room usage changes affecting the Room Type Code iSpace allows multiple Time Period Allocations during the year. When the Room Type changes, a new Time Period Allocation must be created and the current allocation closed. To simplify complex coding involving multiple departments, the process of "Room Sharing" has been incorporated into iSpace.

Contact

David Ida

Sr Space Analyst

Cost and Management Analysis

(650) 725-7565

1. Time Period Allocations

When the Room Type changes, a new Time Period Allocation must be created and the current allocation closed.

Example: Multiple Room Type Codes during the year

Room 100 was used as follows during the fiscal year.

  1. Fall Quarter - the room was used as an office for Post Doctoral student.
  2. Winter and Spring Quarters - the room was under renovation and temporarily unassignable.
  3. Summer Quarter - the room was used as a non-class lab where 10% of the activity was related to Departmental Research and 90% of the activity was related to Organized Research.

In order to record the multiple Room Type Codes that occurred during the year, Room 100 would be split into Time Period Allocations in iSPACE as follows.

  1. Sept 1 to Jan 10: Room Type Code 366 (Office - Post Doctoral), 100% DA [A(100)].
  2. Jan 11 to June 15:  Room Type Code 082 (Under Alteration), 100% Temporarily Unassigned [X(100)].
  3. June 16 to Present:  Room Type Code 251 (Non-class Lab), 10% DR and 90% OR [L(10), R(90)].

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2. Room Sharing

Room Sharing involves reporting one physical room with multiple Department Codes or Primary Individuals (PI's) associated with the room during the fiscal year. The new system, iSpace allows for multiple departments with multiple PI's in any given Time Period Allocation. In addition, each PI may have multiple Function Codes. In all cases these multiple occupants/uses will be allocated their appropriate percentage of occupancy.  All percentages must add to 100%.

Example: Two or more departments share space

Department A and Department B "shared" Room 302 which is 100 square feet. Each department used 50% of the room. Functionally, Department A used the room solely for Organized Research (R) and Department B used the room solely for Instruction (I). The room would be entered in iSpace with two departments:

Room 302:

  1. 50% Department A, 100% OR [R(100)]
  2. 50% Department B, 100% Instruction [I(100)].

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3. Global Changes

Help is available when you have a large number of rooms that need to be changed as a result of a large change in a building or for a department. This could result from a move to a new building, a whole floor renovation, or a change in the department’s org code.

The iSpace system administrator in Maps and Records in many cases can make changes to a large block of rooms in order to mitigate the burden of changing the rooms one by one by the space coordinator. There are several methods by which this is accomplished depending on the situation: these include SQL program changes or uploading data on new rooms from a user provided Excel spreadsheet. You should contact the space analyst in CMA and discuss the following information so that we can evaluate if a global change can be done:

  • user department
  • building(s) identification
  • room numbers affected
  • description of the space and what you need to change
  • time period related to the space change

Based on this discussion, if a global change appears feasible, a request will be submitted to the iSpace system administrator to proceed.

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4. Appendices

4.1 Space Manual Appendices

 

 

Contact

David Ida

Sr Space Analyst

Cost and Management Analysis

(650) 725-7565

1. Appendix A: Listing of Room Type Codes

The first step in coding space is to determine the correct Room Type Code. Select the code from the Listing of Room Type Codes

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2. Appendix C: Guidelines for Documentation

The objective of documentation is to allow an independent person to review a department's space and to understand the basis for its coding. Use the Guidelines for Documentation to help you document use of space for your department.

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5. Space Inventory Procedures

5.1 Space Inventory Procedures

This page presents both the who and the what of the Space Inventory process. The Space Coordinator Contact Lists show the current authorized contact person for each department. The Procedures section contains soft copies of the instructions, forms and tools pertaining to the successful completion of the Space Inventory process.

1. Space Coordinator Contact Lists

The contact lists have been divided into two separate lists:

  1. University Space Coordinators (updated 9/2010)
  2. School of Medicine Departments (updated 9/2010) 

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2. Other Space Inventory Resources

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